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Natural wines Germany

Natural wine is a trend that is also becoming increasingly popular in Germany. What began in France at the end of the 1980s has now also been gaining ground in Germany for a good two decades. The biodynamic concept has its origins in Germany and is so well established in German society that even ordinary supermarket chains offer Demeter-certified bean sprouts and biodynamic wines.

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Orange 2022

winestyle-img Fresh & Juicy
Floral
Like a fragrant flower meadow with notes like rose and jasmine blossoms and delicate meadow herbs.
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Animating, Juicy
16,50 €
22,00 €/L

Concubine Weiß 2022

winestyle-img Fresh & Juicy
Floral
Like a fragrant flower meadow with notes like rose and jasmine blossoms and delicate meadow herbs.
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Juicy, Animating
13,90 €
13,90 €/L

Concubine Rosé 2022

winestyle-img Fresh & Juicy
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Floral
Like a fragrant flower meadow with notes like rose and jasmine blossoms and delicate meadow herbs.
Juicy, Animating
13,90 €
13,90 €/L

Riesling 2022

winestyle-img Fine & Layered
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Vegetative
Smooth, Elegant
22,00 €
29,33 €/L

Morio 2022

winestyle-img Fresh & Juicy
Floral
Like a fragrant flower meadow with notes like rose and jasmine blossoms and delicate meadow herbs.
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Aromatic, Structured
18,90 €
25,20 €/L

Riesling 2022

winestyle-img Fine & Layered
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Vegetative
Elegant, Juicy
20,90 €
27,87 €/L

Sylvaner 2022

winestyle-img Fine & Layered
Vegetative
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Lively, Complex
20,90 €
27,87 €/L

Clo du Paradis 2021 Riesling feat. Seckinger

winestyle-img Fine & Layered
Mineral
Like the idea of a wet stone: sometimes cool, salty, slightly smoky and mostly a tight, grippy texture on the palate. Rather a mouthfeel than aromatics.
Fruity
Like a fruit basket of fresh fruit: From citrus to peach, apple, pear, to cherry, raspberry or plum.
Elegant, Fine-meshed
35,00 €
46,67 €/L

Sylvaner 2022

winestyle-img Fine & Layered
Mineral
Like the idea of a wet stone: sometimes cool, salty, slightly smoky and mostly a tight, grippy texture on the palate. Rather a mouthfeel than aromatics.
Vegetative
Reductive, Elegant, Complex
33,00 €
44,00 €/L

The origin of the biodynamic idea

The biodynamic idea originated in Germany, thanks to none other than Rudolf Steiner. Natural wine, on the other hand, was almost nowhere to be found in Germany. As in neighbouring Switzerland, winemakers and consumers have remained wedded to an outdated, sterile idea of perfection in oenology, with the result that the aesthetics of natural wine have only gained in importance in Germany in the last ten years. The first beginnings of natural viticulture in Germany only occurred in the late 2000s among some Moselle winegrowers who were encouraged by Scandinavian sommeliers and wine buyers.

Natural wine trend reversal in the Moselle

The Moselle region is home to numerous winegrowers who not only produce excellent wines, but also place a strong focus on sustainability. From organic cultivation to biodynamic farming - winegrowers here are passionately committed to preserving the environment and the quality of their wines.

Although he did not work organically, Mosel winemaker Dr Ulli Stein has been experimenting with unfiltered and sulphite-free winemaking since 2007. The true pioneers of near-natural viticulture in Germany can be found half an hour's drive further south in Kinheim. Rudolf and Rita Trossen have been cultivating their vineyard biodynamically since 1978 and produced a series of unsulphurised, unfiltered wines with great success in 2011. This inspired organic and biodynamic colleagues such as Thorsten Melsheimer and Jan Matthias Klein to also produce wines in this style. Since the 2010s, a large number of young German winegrowers from the Palatinate to Franconia have dedicated themselves to natural viticulture.

An act of rebellion

In their youth, Rita and Rudolf Trossen courageously took over Rudolf's small family estate. Their groundbreaking act of rebellion manifested itself in the introduction of biodynamic viticulture right in the midst of the conservative chemical agriculture in the Middle Moselle. Inspired by a Belgian wine collector named William Vermeylen, who happened to ride by the Trossen winery on his bicycle and stopped, Rudolf Trossen ventured into the world of natural wines. Under the influence of this collector and a handful of Danish sommeliers, Trossen began bottling his Purus series in 2011. Disinclined toward extended skin contact, Trossen mainly produces directly pressed parcel blends of Riesling and red wines from Dornfelder and Pinot Noir. Low yields from old vines planted on inclined blue slate soils before the phylloxera plague and cultivated biodynamically for a long time contribute to making these Rieslings among the most fascinating and radiant in the world.

Natural wine in Germany today

The German wine world is in upheaval. Natural wines from Germany are on everyone's lips. This is particularly evident in the fact that most natural wine bars in Berlin are bursting at the seams. What makes the German natural wine scene so cool? Natural wines are available in all wine regions and from all grape varieties. The range is larger than ever before. And Germany, as a wine country, is extremely versatile.

The key players in the German natural wine scene are young winemakers who have consciously chosen to go against conventional viticulture. Whether from the Pfalz, Rheinhessen, Mosel, or Rheingau, they are adventurous and exploring new paths. The scene is experiencing dynamic growth and is expected to evolve even further in the coming years. There are now over 1,000 natural wine producers. It is anticipated that the diversity of wine regions, grape varieties, and styles will continue to grow. Demand is also expected to increase.

German natural wine pioneers

In addition to pioneers such as Rita and Rudolf Trossen, there are a large number of winegrowers who produce organic and biodynamic natural wines. Some top natural wine producers are: Wasenhaus, Julien Renard, Stefan Vetter, Daniel and Bianka Schmitt and from the Drops range Georg Lingenfelder, Odinstal, Andi Mann and Carrousel de Tete. What unites them all? Their natural wines are unadulterated and show the character of the grapes and the individual terroir in Germany.